Like all areas of society, the Royal Air Force can’t escape the need to go green or to save money, and it hopes that virtual training can help it do just that

Like all areas of society, the Royal Air Force can’t escape the need to go green or to save money, and it hopes that virtual training can help it do just that.

It costs tens of thousands of pounds every time the RAF sends a pilot up in a Typhoon as part of a training exercise, but in the future the Air Force hopes to reduce how often this happens, and BAE Systems is helping it achieve that goal.

Pilot training is currently 70 per cent in the air, and 30 per cent synthetic training. 

However, by 2040, the aim is to move to have pilots spend 20 per cent of their time in the air during training, and 80 per cent using a flight simulator — likely the maximum safe amount of flight time required to keep training up to the required standard. 

Sir Stuart Atha, Director Defence Capability at BAE, who served as Deputy Commander of Operations, Air Command python elasticsearch bulk index json in the RAF, said virtual training can be more efficient and reflect the reality of warfare.

BAE estimates a large scale simulator training mission, involving multiple aircraft and pilots working virtually rather than in air, could save about 1,000 tonnes of CO2 per major training session. 

It would take 1,225 trees to soak up this much carbon — roughly equal to the carbon produced by someone driving 2.5 million miles in petrol car.  

Like all areas of society, the Royal Air Force can't escape the need to go green or to save money, and it hopes that virtual training can help it do just that

Like all areas of society, the Royal Air Force can’t escape the need to go green or to save money, and it hopes that virtual training can help it do just that

It costs tens of thousands of pounds every time the RAF sends a pilot up in a Typhoon as part of a training exercise, but in future the air force hopes to reduce how often this happens, and BAE systems are helping them achieve that goal

It costs tens of thousands of pounds every time the RAF sends a pilot up in a Typhoon as part of a training exercise, but in future the air force hopes to reduce how often this happens, and BAE systems are helping them achieve that goal

The aim is to move to have pilots spend 20 per cent of their time in the air during training, and 80 per cent using a flight simulator by 2040, which, an RAF spokesperson says, is part of the ASTRA Programme, and not unique to Typhoon

The aim is to move to have pilots spend 20 per cent of their time in the air during training, and 80 per cent using a flight simulator by 2040, which, an RAF spokesperson says, is part of the ASTRA Programme, and not unique to Typhoon

<div class="art-ins mol-factbox sciencetech halfRHS" data-version="2" id="mol-b9f077e0-4948-11ec-8953-b116c19e33f4" website pilots to spend just 20% of practice sessions in real fighter jets

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